Addressing an Aging Population

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Report highlights coffee’s potential role in reducing cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) may protect against age-related cognitive decline and related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, according to a new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

This research supports mounting evidence suggesting that “long-term coffee intake could be a viable strategy for reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other diseases associated with aging.”

Key highlights about coffee from the report include:

  • Research published in 2016 suggests that moderate coffee consumption can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s by up to 27%. Research has suggested that it is regular, long-term coffee drinking that is key to helping to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease.
  • The association between coffee consumption and cognitive decline is illustrated by a ‘U-shaped’ pattern in recent meta-analyses, with the greatest protection seen at an intake of approximately 3-5 cups of coffee per day.
  • Although the precise mechanisms of action behind the suggested association between coffee and age-related cognitive decline are unknown, caffeine is likely to be involved. There are many other compounds in coffee, such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, which may also play a role. Caffeic acid, for example, is a polyphenol (antioxidant) found in coffee, and research suggests that these may be associated with improved cognitive function.

Read ISIC’s statement on the latest findings, or see the full report.

Visit Coffee & Me for more information on caffeine, coffee, and cognitive health.

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