Your Coworkers Really Are More Likable After Coffee, Science Confirms

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Coffee can make meetings tolerable more productive – and positive

Coffee Brews Better Group Performance, UC Davis Study Finds

First Research on the Effects of Caffeine on Group Work

The following post was originally published by UC Davis News

By Brad Hooker and Julia Ann Easley 

 

Planning a meeting? Serving coffee can focus group discussion, boost involvement and leave members feeling better about their own and others’ participation.

Those are the findings of new research on the effects of caffeine on group performance from the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis.

Decades of coffee research have explored its effects on the individual, but this study is the first on the effects on performance in group tasks.

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New Opportunities in Office Coffee

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57% of US workers are less than “very satisfied” with their workplace coffee area.
NCA National Coffee Drinking Trends 2018 

NCA Webinar: Office Coffee Service Challenges
Featuring David Sprinkle, Packaged Facts
April 11, 1-2 PM EST  Now Available On-Demand For NCA Members

PR Newswire — Coffee and coffee drinks made/dispensed at work play a primary role in meeting employed coffee drinkers’ at-work coffee procurement needs, according to Office Coffee Service in the U.S.: Market Trends and Opportunities, 3rd Edition, an upcoming report from market research firm Packaged Facts.

But given the importance employees place on various coffee-related attributes, employed coffee drinkers’ satisfaction with those attributes falls short when applied to their workplace, which suggests that employers can win points by enhancing coffee-related products and services (most employees believe they should not have to pay for coffee at work anyway). Doing so may also translate to growing the bottom line, since employees are likely to view coffee as a productivity tool.

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Are Workers “Too Busy” For Coffee?

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Compiled by Kyra Auffermann, NCA

A New Study Looks at Coffee and Productivity in the Workplace

Even before I was employed by the coffee industry, my productivity has been fueled primarily by coffee – followed by WiFi, a solid soundtrack, and then another cup of coffee.

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Fortunately, “procaffeination” is supported by science:  Studies suggest that consuming caffeine can help promote creativity, concentration, and even prevent workplace accidents. Plus, coffee breaks are linked to better morale and collaboration at work.

Yet nearly one-third (29%) of European workers said that they didn’t drink coffee at work because they didn’t have time or were too busy, according to a new study commissioned by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

The research found that workplace coffee drinking habits are shaped by time, taste, and the desire for a productivity boost. More than two-thirds (68%) of respondents said they always or often drink coffee during the working day.

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Which Profession Drinks the Most Coffee?

Even if you don’t work in the industry, coffee is likely essential to your career. At-work coffee consumption is rising, according to National Coffee Drinking Trends data.

But which professionals are consuming the most? I Love Coffee made the following infographic based on the results of this survey on coffee consumption trends in the workplace.

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Check out I Love Coffee for more coffee infographics

Optimizing Office Coffee

By Daniel Granderson, Packaged Facts
Twitter: @packaged_facts

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86% of full-time employees drink coffee — and for most of these employees, coffee is a daily habit, according to Office Coffee Service in the U.S.: Market Trends and Opportunities (March 2015), a new report by Packaged Facts.

Among daily coffee drinkers, per Packaged Facts consumer survey data, 75% had drunk coffee at work within the past seven days, including 65 million (54%) who make coffee at work and 61 million (50%) who bring coffee to work.

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