Is Cold Brew Good For You?

The following post is adapted from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health News 

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Science shows coffee can have major health perks at any temperature.

Summer’s hottest drink is also a healthy way to beat the heat.

Cold brew coffee — made by steeping coffee grounds in cold water overnight or longer — is just as healthy as regular coffee, according to Frank Hu, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in a recent Health.com article.

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Study: Drinking Coffee May Help Protect Against Liver Disease

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A new study shows that drinking four cups of coffee a day may help prevent deadly disease, and may even counter the damage caused by unhealthy diet and lifestyle habits. (One cup of herbal tea also offers the same protection.)

Previous evidence suggested that coffee and tea could have a protective effect on liver tissue, but the results haven’t been conclusive. Now for the first time, scientists have confirmed the potential benefits of these beloved beverages.

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Even Daily Coffee Drinkers Can Boost Athletic Performance With Caffeine

“Caffeine improves athletic performance. This is a truth almost universally acknowledged in exercise science.” — Gretchen Reynolds, The New York Times

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Drinking caffeinated coffee has been scientifically linked to improved physical performance. And for years, many scientists, coaches, and athletes believed that an athlete had to abstain for days or weeks before an event to gain a boost.

But a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that these ideas about caffeine and athletic performance are outdated.

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Nervous About Caffeine? Don’t Be.

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Go ahead, have another cup.

An unprecedented scientific review on caffeine safety confirms that drinking up to four cups of coffee daily, or about 400 milligrams of caffeine, is “not associated with overt, adverse effects” in healthy adults. (Pregnant woman and minors should reduce their intake below that amount, according to the report.) [1]

The review was conducted by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), and is the most extensive of its kind to date. Scientists scoured data from more than 700 independent studies related to various human health effects and caffeine.

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Flavor, Fat, and Fermentation: 5 Coffee Trends You Can’t Ignore

By Kyra Auffermann, NCA

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For today’s consumers, it’s more than “just” a cup of coffee. From extra antioxidants to artisanal craftsmanship, the future of coffee is anything but ordinary.

During the recent NCA webinar, “Coffee Outlook 2017,” Datassential’s Mark DiDomenico shared how the latest food trends are impacting the coffee market:

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Addressing an Aging Population

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Report highlights coffee’s potential role in reducing cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) may protect against age-related cognitive decline and related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, according to a new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

This research supports mounting evidence suggesting that “long-term coffee intake could be a viable strategy for reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other diseases associated with aging.”

Key highlights about coffee from the report include: Continue reading

Coffee and Guinea Pigs

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Recently, NCA CEO Bill Murray wrote about how to understand the good vs. not-so-good research in health headlines.

Coffee is more popular than tap water in the U.S. (according to the 2016 NCDT), and it’s one of the most researched beverages in the world. The problem is, a lot of information can lead to a lot of misinformation.

Not all research is created equal. Potential outliers aside, even studies conducted with the best intentions may have serious methodological flaws (like recall bias).

Now the latest headlines are giving us another example: A new study suggests that caffeine consumption may cause short-term hearing loss ….in guinea pigs.

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Behind the Headlines: Coffee, Health, and Research

For the informed coffee drinker.

By Bill M. Murray, CAE, NCA, CEO
@Bill_CoffeeAssn

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We know that coffee helps fight fatigue – but how do we know this?

First, from personal observation – coffee drinkers feel the effects of caffeine, and sometimes observe them in others.

Second, there’s evidence in the form of coffee-drinker surveys. In 2016, 84% of coffee drinkers said that “coffee wakes me up and gets me going.”[1]

Third, independent researchers suggest that consuming caffeinated coffee may be linked to improved brain function, physical endurance, and athletic performance.[2]

Three different types of research, all leading to similar conclusions.

But when it comes to diet and health-related research, there are new headlines every day – sometimes with opposite claims. Coffee itself isn’t immune from this phenomenon, and it’s easy to see why.

Since the early 1990’s, at least 2,700 coffee and health related studies have been reported by researchers from all around the world.[3] With new coffee and health headlines emerging on a weekly basis, it is important that coffee drinkers think smart about the coffee and health news that breaks over their morning cup of coffee, some of which may even appear to be contradictory.

If you’re trying to stay up-to-date on coffee and health research, here are 4 things to keep in mind when reading the headlines.

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7 Surprising Reasons Why Coffee Is Really Good for You

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This post originally appeared on Inc.

By Peter Economy

No, I am not a paid representative of the coffee industry. But I am a lifelong fan of this black, piping hot, synapse-stimulating beverage. I can remember as a young lad my parents suggesting that I dip my toast in their coffee for a mildly stimulating treat. That was just a taste of my own personal coffee journey to come.

Truth be told, there’s been a lot of scientific research on this ubiquitous liquid, and most of the news has been good. In fact, the evidence is increasingly pointing to the fact that coffee is actually really good for you – and in ways that go far beyond just keeping you awake during one more long staff meeting!

Consider these 7 reasons why you just might want to make coffee a part of your daily diet. Continue reading