Study: Drinking Coffee May Help Protect Against Liver Disease

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A new study shows that drinking four cups of coffee a day may help prevent deadly disease, and may even counter the damage caused by unhealthy diet and lifestyle habits. (One cup of herbal tea also offers the same protection.)

Previous evidence suggested that coffee and tea could have a protective effect on liver tissue, but the results haven’t been conclusive. Now for the first time, scientists have confirmed the potential benefits of these beloved beverages.

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Even Daily Coffee Drinkers Can Boost Athletic Performance With Caffeine

“Caffeine improves athletic performance. This is a truth almost universally acknowledged in exercise science.” — Gretchen Reynolds, The New York Times

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Drinking caffeinated coffee has been scientifically linked to improved physical performance. And for years, many scientists, coaches, and athletes believed that an athlete had to abstain for days or weeks before an event to gain a boost.

But a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that these ideas about caffeine and athletic performance are outdated.

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NCA Speaks Out Against Seattle Beverage Tax

“As a regressive tax borne largely by consumers, the proposal can hurt […] hundreds of independent roasters, coffee shops, restaurants, retailers, and suppliers. Aimed at promoting a healthy diet, the tax would have the opposite effect if applied to coffee.”  – William M. Murray, CEO, NCA 

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The Seattle City Council will vote on introducing a “soda tax” in the city on Monday. The measure would put a one-cent per ounce tax on sugary beverages, and would impact coffee as collateral damage. Furthermore, small businesses would be disproportionately affected.

The National Coffee Association has submitted the following letter to the City Council to express the industry’s strong position on how the tax would severely impact the local coffee economy and that coffee should be exempt should any soda tax be ratified.

Read the full NCA comment letter.

In the News

Is Seattle’s proposed soda tax also a tax on sugary lattes?

Take Action

Tell the Seattle city council that levying a soda tax on coffee would have unintended and unanticipated consequences for the coffee industry and local businesses. Send an email to  council@seattle.gov, or call 206-684-8888.

Comments? Share your thoughts in the comments below, or get in touch at info@ncausa.org.

 

 

Addressing an Aging Population

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Report highlights coffee’s potential role in reducing cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) may protect against age-related cognitive decline and related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, according to a new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

This research supports mounting evidence suggesting that “long-term coffee intake could be a viable strategy for reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other diseases associated with aging.”

Key highlights about coffee from the report include: Continue reading

FSMA Compliance Deadline for Large Companies Has Arrived

By ToxStrategies

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The first major compliance deadline for larger businesses (> 500 employees) to comply with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Preventive Control rules for human and animal foods has arrived.  FSMA was “a call for a new, prevention-oriented safety system.”  This new focus on prevention requires food facilities to have written food safety plans encompassing both Good Manufacturing Practices and applicable Hazard Analysis and Preventive Controls.

As of September 19, businesses involved in the production of human foods must comply with both the Hazard Analysis and Preventive Controls regulations as well as adhere to the current Good Manufacturing Practices published in 21 CFR Part 117 Subpart B.  Animal food businesses are only required to comply with current Good Manufacturing Practices described in 21 CFR Part 507 Subpart B.

This is a new era for food safety regulation and is being met with some expected angst and trepidation. Continue reading

Finding Answers to Today’s Top 5 Challenges

By Kyra Auffermann, National Coffee Association

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Our industry is facing a range of unprecedented challenges. The coffee supply chain is incredibly complex – and interconnected. This can create a lot of uncertainty for businesses trying to succeed in such a competitive market.

But with a shift in perspective – and by asking the right questions – potential problems can become opportunities.

Check out the following list of the top challenges facing coffee companies today. (And if you’re interested in learning more, join leaders from across the industry at the NCA Coffee Summit, Oct. 26-28, Miami, FL.)

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Coffee and Guinea Pigs

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Recently, NCA CEO Bill Murray wrote about how to understand the good vs. not-so-good research in health headlines.

Coffee is more popular than tap water in the U.S. (according to the 2016 NCDT), and it’s one of the most researched beverages in the world. The problem is, a lot of information can lead to a lot of misinformation.

Not all research is created equal. Potential outliers aside, even studies conducted with the best intentions may have serious methodological flaws (like recall bias).

Now the latest headlines are giving us another example: A new study suggests that caffeine consumption may cause short-term hearing loss ….in guinea pigs.

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Behind the Headlines: Coffee, Health, and Research

For the informed coffee drinker.

By Bill M. Murray, CAE, NCA, CEO
@Bill_CoffeeAssn

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We know that coffee helps fight fatigue – but how do we know this?

First, from personal observation – coffee drinkers feel the effects of caffeine, and sometimes observe them in others.

Second, there’s evidence in the form of coffee-drinker surveys. In 2016, 84% of coffee drinkers said that “coffee wakes me up and gets me going.”[1]

Third, independent researchers suggest that consuming caffeinated coffee may be linked to improved brain function, physical endurance, and athletic performance.[2]

Three different types of research, all leading to similar conclusions.

But when it comes to diet and health-related research, there are new headlines every day – sometimes with opposite claims. Coffee itself isn’t immune from this phenomenon, and it’s easy to see why.

Since the early 1990’s, at least 2,700 coffee and health related studies have been reported by researchers from all around the world.[3] With new coffee and health headlines emerging on a weekly basis, it is important that coffee drinkers think smart about the coffee and health news that breaks over their morning cup of coffee, some of which may even appear to be contradictory.

If you’re trying to stay up-to-date on coffee and health research, here are 4 things to keep in mind when reading the headlines.

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