Addressing an Aging Population

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Report highlights coffee’s potential role in reducing cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) may protect against age-related cognitive decline and related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, according to a new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

This research supports mounting evidence suggesting that “long-term coffee intake could be a viable strategy for reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other diseases associated with aging.”

Key highlights about coffee from the report include: Continue reading

(Not So) Hot Off The Press!

By Bill M. Murray, CAE, NCA, CEO
@Bill_CoffeeAssn

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The latest coffee and health news continues to be overwhelmingly positive for coffee drinkers.

On June 15, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded that it can no longer classify coffee as a “possible carcinogen.” In fact, coffee may have protective powers against liver and endometrial cancer (see the full NCA news release).

This announcement marked the first time IARC reversed a food or beverage classification, adding to the growing body of good news about coffee, on topics such as:

We’ve compiled some of this research on Coffee and Me, where you can find links to relevant independent studies and reports.

What Are Very Hot Beverages?

When the WHO released its coffee finding, it also classified “very hot” beverages as a “probable” cause of cancer. Coffee drinkers should understand that the evidence on which this classification was based did not include even a single study of coffee drinkers.

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Coffee and Guinea Pigs

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Recently, NCA CEO Bill Murray wrote about how to understand the good vs. not-so-good research in health headlines.

Coffee is more popular than tap water in the U.S. (according to the 2016 NCDT), and it’s one of the most researched beverages in the world. The problem is, a lot of information can lead to a lot of misinformation.

Not all research is created equal. Potential outliers aside, even studies conducted with the best intentions may have serious methodological flaws (like recall bias).

Now the latest headlines are giving us another example: A new study suggests that caffeine consumption may cause short-term hearing loss ….in guinea pigs.

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Behind the Headlines: Coffee, Health, and Research

For the informed coffee drinker.

By Bill M. Murray, CAE, NCA, CEO
@Bill_CoffeeAssn

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We know that coffee helps fight fatigue – but how do we know this?

First, from personal observation – coffee drinkers feel the effects of caffeine, and sometimes observe them in others.

Second, there’s evidence in the form of coffee-drinker surveys. In 2016, 84% of coffee drinkers said that “coffee wakes me up and gets me going.”[1]

Third, independent researchers suggest that consuming caffeinated coffee may be linked to improved brain function, physical endurance, and athletic performance.[2]

Three different types of research, all leading to similar conclusions.

But when it comes to diet and health-related research, there are new headlines every day – sometimes with opposite claims. Coffee itself isn’t immune from this phenomenon, and it’s easy to see why.

Since the early 1990’s, at least 2,700 coffee and health related studies have been reported by researchers from all around the world.[3] With new coffee and health headlines emerging on a weekly basis, it is important that coffee drinkers think smart about the coffee and health news that breaks over their morning cup of coffee, some of which may even appear to be contradictory.

If you’re trying to stay up-to-date on coffee and health research, here are 4 things to keep in mind when reading the headlines.

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How Much Caffeine Is In My Coffee?

The Challenges of Measuring Caffeine Levels

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By William (Bill) Murray, President & CEO, NCA
Twitter: @Bill_CoffeeAssn

Coffee has long been associated with energy and activity – the legend of coffee’s origin holds that it was discovered because of the energy kick it gave to goats eating cherries from a coffee tree.

Most coffee drinkers have that first cup of coffee early in the morning, whether decaffeinated or regular, to start their day. According to the latest National Coffee Drinking Trends Report, 81% of daily coffee consumers report drinking coffee at breakfast.

Despite the strong association between coffee and caffeine, the National Coffee Association (NCA), which was established in 1911, is only now publishing information on the levels of caffeine that may be found in coffee.

Why?

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