Is Cold Brew Good For You?

The following post is adapted from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health News 

Iced latte on leaf patterned tea towel

Science shows coffee can have major health perks at any temperature.

Summer’s hottest drink is also a healthy way to beat the heat.

Cold brew coffee — made by steeping coffee grounds in cold water overnight or longer — is just as healthy as regular coffee, according to Frank Hu, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in a recent Health.com article.

Continue reading

Do Coffee Drinkers Live Longer?

iStock-540129448.jpg

Two big studies support the long-term health benefits of coffee

It turns out, a cup of coffee can do a lot more than just perk up your morning.

People who drink more coffee may have a lower risk of premature death from disease, according to two new studies published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The results were consistent among more than 700,000 participants from a variety of racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds.

Previous research has suggested that coffee is good for you, but was often limited to smaller groups and people of European decent, writes the Los Angeles Times.

And both studies found benefits for people who drank decaffeinated as well.

Continue reading

Study: Drinking Coffee May Help Protect Against Liver Disease

cup-2318315_1280

A new study shows that drinking four cups of coffee a day may help prevent deadly disease, and may even counter the damage caused by unhealthy diet and lifestyle habits. (One cup of herbal tea also offers the same protection.)

Previous evidence suggested that coffee and tea could have a protective effect on liver tissue, but the results haven’t been conclusive. Now for the first time, scientists have confirmed the potential benefits of these beloved beverages.

Continue reading

Even Daily Coffee Drinkers Can Boost Athletic Performance With Caffeine

“Caffeine improves athletic performance. This is a truth almost universally acknowledged in exercise science.” — Gretchen Reynolds, The New York Times

pexels-photo-287398.jpeg

Drinking caffeinated coffee has been scientifically linked to improved physical performance. And for years, many scientists, coaches, and athletes believed that an athlete had to abstain for days or weeks before an event to gain a boost.

But a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that these ideas about caffeine and athletic performance are outdated.

Continue reading

Nervous About Caffeine? Don’t Be.

StockSnap_D3MS3XB0UW.jpg

Go ahead, have another cup.

An unprecedented scientific review on caffeine safety confirms that drinking up to four cups of coffee daily, or about 400 milligrams of caffeine, is “not associated with overt, adverse effects” in healthy adults. (Pregnant woman and minors should reduce their intake below that amount, according to the report.) [1]

The review was conducted by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), and is the most extensive of its kind to date. Scientists scoured data from more than 700 independent studies related to various human health effects and caffeine.

Continue reading

From Brew Boomers to the Gourmet Generation: National Coffee Drinking Trends 2017

NCDT2017_blog.png

By Kyra Auffermann, NCA

Today’s “typical” cup of coffee is anything but – it may not even be a cup.

Innovation is fueling growth across the gourmet coffee segment (aka specialty coffee), according to the new NCA National Coffee Drinking Trends Report 2017, released at the NCA 2017 Annual Convention in Austin on March 25, presented by Michael Edwards, Dig Insights.

The latest data shows a market shift toward high-quality, premium beverages, with younger demographics driving this change.

So what does this mean for the coffee industry? Here are the top consumption trends, based on the latest market data.

Continue reading

Addressing an Aging Population

StockSnap_8C35014CE3.jpg

Report highlights coffee’s potential role in reducing cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) may protect against age-related cognitive decline and related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, according to a new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

This research supports mounting evidence suggesting that “long-term coffee intake could be a viable strategy for reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other diseases associated with aging.”

Key highlights about coffee from the report include: Continue reading