Which Type of Coffee Drinker Are You?

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New research identifies three main groups of caffeine sensitivity among individuals.

Genetic differences help explain why everyone experiences coffee’s effects differently.

via Coffee & Health

Coffee drinkers fall into one of three major groups based on their caffeine sensitivity, according to physician and author Dr J.W. Langer, in a new report authored for the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

The report, “Genetics, Metabolism and Individual Responses to Caffeine,” draws on existing research to explain how the body metabolizes caffeine, why some people are more affected by caffeine than others, and how healthcare professionals can take this into account when advising patients.

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FDA Takes Action Against Highly Concentrated Caffeine in Dietary Supplements, Citing Public Health

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Dietary supplements containing pure caffeine are unlawful when sold in bulk quantities directly to consumers, due to the high risk that they will be erroneously consumed at excessive doses, according to the FDA.

The following is an excerpt from the latest NCA Member Alert

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued a new guidance  to clarify that selling dietary supplements containing pure or highly concentrated caffeine in bulk quantities directly to consumers is  “considered unlawful,” because of the high risk that they will be accidentally consumed at excessive, potentially dangerous doses.

Read the FDA press announcement

With respect to pure or highly concentrated powdered or liquid caffeine, the National Coffee Association (NCA) supports the FDA’s common-sense measure to protect consumers. But it is important to remember that these products have very little relation to coffee: a single teaspoon of powdered caffeine has as much caffeine as 20 to 28 cups (3,200 mg).

In fact, drinking coffee – and the natural caffeine it contains – is perfectly safe for most people. It may even be good for you.

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What the Latest Prop. 65 Ruling Means for Coffee Businesses

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Read the official NCA statement on the latest Prop. 65 & Coffee Decision

The following article was originally published on Daily Coffee News

By Nick Brown

In the 12 days since a California court ruled that coffee sellers in the state must post cancer warnings in accordance with the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, commonly known as “Proposition 65”, mainstream media has been abuzz.

While the vast majority of reports have noted the lack of scientific evidence linking coffee to cancer, that kind of widespread publicity naturally creates more questions than answers. Such is the nature of the 24-hour news cycle, in which many people can’t afford the time to read beyond the headlines.

So as the two big Cs of coffee and cancer have shared the public stage, a third big C has swept over the audience: confusion.

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Can Olympic Athletes Have Caffeine?

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It’s more complicated than you may think.

Caffeine has been consistently shown to improve athletic performance, and its consumption has been subjected to ongoing scrutiny for elite athletes.

Today, Olympic athletes are permitted to enjoy a cup of coffee before competing. But between 1984-2004, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned high concentrations of caffeine from all Olympic events.

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Year in Review: Our Top 5 Coffee Posts of 2017

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2017 was a big year for coffee.

What – and where – we drink is changing. Specialty trends moved into the mainstream, from the cold brew craze to the rise of RTD. Today, consumers have unprecedented control to customize their beverage, from unique flavors to nutrition-driven additives (oat milk, anyone?).

To reflect how these changes are reshaping our industry, the NCA even added a new “gourmet” category to our National Coffee Drinking Trends report.

Yet at the same time, the fundamentals of coffee remain as relevant as ever.  Whether you’re a brewing beginner or a brilliant barista, understanding the basics of what makes a quality cup is still crucial to developing and refining new brew methods and flavors. For instance: Extraction will always be a factor, and your equipment needs to be clean.

We’re looking forward to what the next year will bring – we’re seeing a lot of exciting new research on coffee and health, opportunities to improve industry best practices, and critical developments in sustainability.

But the New Year is also an opportunity to reflect on where we’ve been. Here are the most popular NCA blog posts in 2017, highlighting the importance of both innovation and tradition in the world of coffee.

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Study: Drinking Coffee Daily Does More Good Than Harm

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A massive meta-analysis suggests that the benefits of daily coffee consumption outweigh the risk.

“The bottom line is that we suggest [coffee] can be a good part of a healthy diet.”

Robin Poole, University of Southampton

Science continues to suggest that coffee is good for you.

Based on a systematic umbrella review of 201 meta-analyses recently published in the BMJ, researchers from the University of Southampton found that moderate coffee consumption was more often associated with benefit than harm.

Drinking three to four cups of coffee a day showed the greatest benefit in terms of cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke, versus not drinking coffee. (Drinking coffee beyond these amounts was not associated with harm, but the benefits were less pronounced.)

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11 Coffee Myths You Should Stop Believing Immediately

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Edited post via Thrillist 
By Jeremy Glass (@candyandpizza)

It can be hard to enjoy your morning coffee when there are so many myths surrounding what’s in your cup floating around. For instance, apparently coffee makes you poop. (Actually, that one’s true.)

Regardless, there are still a ton of tall tales being passed around that negatively impact the way you consume coffee.

Drink in these 11 facts and wake up.

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Are Workers “Too Busy” For Coffee?

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Compiled by Kyra Auffermann, NCA

A New Study Looks at Coffee and Productivity in the Workplace

Even before I was employed by the coffee industry, my productivity has been fueled primarily by coffee – followed by WiFi, a solid soundtrack, and then another cup of coffee.

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Fortunately, “procaffeination” is supported by science:  Studies suggest that consuming caffeine can help promote creativity, concentration, and even prevent workplace accidents. Plus, coffee breaks are linked to better morale and collaboration at work.

Yet nearly one-third (29%) of European workers said that they didn’t drink coffee at work because they didn’t have time or were too busy, according to a new study commissioned by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

The research found that workplace coffee drinking habits are shaped by time, taste, and the desire for a productivity boost. More than two-thirds (68%) of respondents said they always or often drink coffee during the working day.

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